ITP End of Year Events – Thesis Presentations and End of Semester Show

ITP Spring Show 2006
A two day exhibition of interactive sight, sound and physical objects from the student artists of ITP.

This event is free and open to the public. No need to RSVP.

ITP Thesis Presentations 2006
ITP’s graduating students will be presenting a wide variety of highly creative and interactive projects that they have constructed over the course of their final project seminars.

Students have been encouraged to undertake projects that bring together the conceptual and design issues that they have engaged in during their two years of study at ITP.

Projects will include installation based work, digital video and audio pieces, interactive 3D, games and educational applications, to name only a few.

ITP will be providing a live webcast of all the thesis presentations.

Media 3.0

Media 3.0 with Shelly Palmer
A new show to air on NYC TV. I scheduled the recording of the first one which is to air Monday at 11PM. I will give a better report after watching but it sounds interesting:

Media 3.0 is a weekly half-hour news/talk show about the media & technology business hosted by award-winning inventor, technologist, composer, author and producer, Shelly Palmer. The business and technology of media industry are changing at an ever increasing rate. As chairman of the Advanced Media Committee of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences NY, Palmer is one of the experts leading the industry’s rapid evolution.

From PVRs to PDAs, from IP Video to VOD … Technology changes everyday, but business rules and our legal system don’t always keep up. Is it a parlor trick or a paradigm shift? Shelly Palmer, along with lead analyst Lydia Loizides, and subject matter experts focus on the issues that dominate the front pages of today’s business journals.

Media 3.0 with Shelly Palmer is a show for consumers, media execs, investors and just about anyone interested in this exciting arena where the business of media meets technology. Fast-paced and combative, Media 3.0 doesn’t pull any punches. Interviews with senior management, opinions from respected business leaders and smart people who will make even the most complicated issues seem simple … It’s Media 3.0 with Shelly Palmer.

TurnHere – Short Films about Cool places ~ The video insiders guide to neighborhoods across the world
My good friend Paul is featured pointing out all of the new buildings going up in the area. Nice..!

The site concept is interesting. I am glad to see that niche video content sites are popping up (as opposed to YouTube and Google Video).

I have a couple of problems with how it is built such as there isn’t a search box (I want to see all of the Brooklyn films but could find no way to do it). There is no way to leave comments or otherwise say that I like any particular video. Also, this might be a personal bias but I think there is too much Flash used. It is fine to present the videos in Flash but why the rest of the site? Last, I wish they would give me an RSS feed with MPEG-4 videos so I can watch on my new Mini hooked up to my TV.

Overall though, I love it.. Good content!

‘The Fourth Screen’ Mobile Media Festival :: global mobile media festival
This festival looks very interesting. They are pushing people to think about the phone in a different way, not just as a television that is carried in your pocket as it seems the providers are pushing for:
‘The Fourth Screen’ Global Mobile Media Festival will focus on the mobile phone as an emerging social, cultural and technological phenomenon.
We invite artists, technologists, and other creative thinkers to submit creations, inventions and concepts in two categories:
1/ moving images: videos made with mobile phone, movies, animation and games intended for mobile delivery
2/ wise technologies: software art, software and hardware that proposes new uses for mobile multimedia communication, applications that have positive cultural, social and economic impact in diverse cultures

Tech Art January Roundup

artnet Magazine – Technical Knock-outs
Dorkbot, “Superlowrez” at vertexList and “Dewanatron” at Pierogi.
From the article:
For the show, vertexList brought aboard eight artists, among them the stalwarts of the Brooklyn art scene: Joe Amrhein, Brian Conley, Matt Freedman, Kristin Lucas, Jillian Mcdonald, Joe McKay, Akiko Sakaizumi and Jude Tallichet. All of them agreed to work with the same gadget for the project, a custom-built box of 12 x 14 electronic light-up “pixels.” Since this dimension is calculated to be just under the pixel-content of the normal computer cursor, the format is extremely constraining (additionally, each box has a chip that can hold just 1,984 “frames” of information.)

Future of Television Conference

Beyond TV: Next Generation TV
So, I went to the Future of Television conference a couple of weeks ago and was somewhat suprised. Last year, I poked my head in to see what was being discussed and it was a big snooze. After checking out the website, I figured it was worth my time this year so I went.

Wow.. I was surprised. You wouldn’t know it but there are people in TV who really “get it”… Larry Kramer from CBS most notably get’s it.

Here is what I had to say on the day of:
I am writing from Future of Television Conference at NYU’s Stern School of Business today. I am here for several reasons, first of all I would like to know what the networks and traditional media concerns think of the scrappy interactive folks. Second, I am here doing recon. Specifically, I would like to know how long video bloggers and other decentralized media creators have before traditional media begins to offer enough of what they are doing to satiate “consumers”. (Perhaps that is not exactly my fear but close enough for now.)

First of all, I have to say that Larry Kramer gets it. He really does. He is open to experimentation. At CBS he has launched many interactive initiatives from a broadband news channel to podcasts of daytime soaps to fantasy sports sites to deep entertainment content add-ons to viewer/user photo posting to writer and producer blogs to actual audience participation through SMS. Phew..

CBS isn’t the only media company doing this type of experimentation. The other networks, cable and broadcast are doing the same or similar. Notable is ABC News Now, ESPN, Playboy and the like.

The question is, whether or not this is enough. Will this engage and empower viewers enough to keep them despite the ever growing number of alternative content channels. The networks certainly know how to deliver programming to a passive audience. They are just beginning to support a more engaged and digitally connected viewer.

A later speaker in the day, IBM’s Saul Berman described the audience by categorizing them in 3 camps. “Massive passives”, the folks that CBS has always served, lean back, over 35, want to be entertained but don’t feel compelled to buy the latest gadget or create their own media.

The next camp, arguably the focus of most of these efforts he described as “Gadgetiers”. He describes this group as heavily involved in content, they are fans, will seek out other individuals who are interested in the same content they are. They will purchase the latest devices, use time shifting (TiVo) and will space shift (TiVo To Go). They are also the heavy buyers, the early adopters, in short, the people that the advertizers (and therefore the networks) covet.

It remains to be seen whether what the networks are starting to do will appeal to this group in the long run. In the short term, it is clear, if you put it out there they will come. How long they stay is another matter.

The last camp, the “Kool kids”, the ones really getting all of the attention, are the hardest to understand. He suggests that this is the group that rejects DRM and “walled gardens”, in short, the group that wants media on their own terms. This is the group that uses P2P software and is heavily social. They have dream devices that aren’t out in the market as of yet.

I know that the kks (short for “Kool kids”) are what have network executives up at night. They are the hackers and inventors who are really driving the internet. TV and media in general will fit into their game or be disregarded.

Ok.. So the big question at the end of the day? Will the cable and TV networks run scared and do everything possible to protect their business models or will they embrace the new like they must. My feeling after this conference is that they have learned something from the music industry and will try to embrace but there will still be a major shakeup and Yahoo! and Google just might become the “new” networks. Good or bad.